Thursday, March 30, 2017

Tutored By The Thomasites


The Americans introduced free public education to all Filipino children. It was a radical contrast to the more than three hundred years of Spanish colonial rule in the Philippines, when education was generally only for the children of the privileged class, of the wealthy, and of those who had the means among the Indios. The Spanish colonialists decreed that most children of the Indios, a slur given to the inhabitants of the Philippine Islands, must remain uneducated. If the Indios became educated, it was feared that they would seek equal treatment, justice, civility, freedom, and inalienable rights. The Spaniards feared that education for the children of the inhabitants would later be used to overthrow their despotic rule.

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Monday, March 27, 2017

Death Or Victory


“You might be wondering why I volunteered to come to Israel as a medical doctor. I’ll tell you a brief story. My father is a pastor. My mother is a teacher in a Christian school. I have a younger sister at home. Her name is Eloise. I remember a message given by my father in one of the Sunday services in our church, the Atlanta Baptist Church. This was back when I was in high school. He mentioned the various signs of the Lord Jesus Christ’s second coming to earth – the increase of false Christs, false prophets or teachers, lawlessness, wars between kingdoms, famines and pestilences, earthquakes, and the preaching of the Gospel of Christ to all nations in the world,” Doctor Davies said.

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Saturday, March 25, 2017

Pearl Harbor


Aurelio Mercado, Sr., a public school teacher in San Manuel Elementary School in the town of San Manuel, in the province of Tarlac, Philippines, and his brother-in-law, Quirino Lacierna, were at the front yard of Aurelio’s house after dinner discussing the aggressive behavior of the Japanese Imperial Army in the East Asia-Southeast Asia Region.

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

My Good Friend Elvie


I didn’t see Elvie again since the night of our graduation from the Plebeian Academy until I met her in Hong Kong in 1990.
It took nineteen long years.
She was surprised when I saw her one Sunday morning at the second floor of the Hong Kong Post Office building, near the Star Ferry in Hong Kong.

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Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Altalena


At the seaport of Marseille, the boarding ramp of the ship Altalena was crowded by Jewish immigrants bound for the newly-established state of Israel. Altalena was the former LST-138, one of the landing crafts used by the Allied countries in the invasion of Germany-controlled France in June, 1944. It was purchased by the US branch of Irgun for the purpose of bringing arms, combatants, and civilians in the land of Israel. The name Altalena was the nom de plume of Zionist leader Ze’ev Jabotinsky.

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An American Teacher In The Philippines


George William Sutterthwaite looked at the map of the Philippine Islands in the office of the American volunteer teachers inside the Walled City of Manila, commonly called Intramuros. The office of the American volunteer teachers was located near the Ayuntamiento in the walled city of the former colonizers of the Philippines, the Spaniards.
George was one of the first Americans who responded to the call by the US Federal government for American volunteer teachers to the Philippine Islands in the year 1901. He arrived in Manila, together with other American volunteer teachers via the ship USS Thomas. They were called by the moniker Thomasites.
Single and adventurous, George wanted to help the youth of the Philippines by teaching them English, Mathematics, and Industrial Arts. These were his favorite subjects. He had been teaching these subjects to American students for two years. He thought that teaching these subjects to the young people in the Philippine Islands would give him more challenges, and more meaning as a teacher, by helping the less privileged youth of the islands.

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Saturday, March 11, 2017

If Tomorrow Never Comes


“I miss you. Wherever you are, my love, I hope you are safe. You can call me by landline or cellphone, or just text me. I’m aware of the situation you are in, and I’m praying for you,” Andrea Gonzales said in her radio program in DWRD titled From Davao With Love.

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